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haun XI - Tesseract: Alain Badiou, Ludwig Wittgenstein, and Lyn Hejinian. Tesseract: Donald Theall. Tesseract: Marcel Jousse, Walter Benjamin, Marcel Duchamp (in the pose of an old man), James Joyce. Underpainting ~ Théodore G??ricault’s ??? The Raft of the Medusa. (Lower Section ~ Romantic French Painting). Giant Foot of the Shaun "Figure": (p. 484 Finnegans Wake). Addressing the Elders, Shaun (and Stanislaus Joyce) "unredeemed" (Irredentist). "Makebelieve" S.P.Q.R. Imperial Roman Motto: Senatus Populusque Romanus. Page 484 Finnegans Wake.

"Marcel Jousse is little-known to the English-speaking scholarly world: Milman Parry-who was his student in Paris-and Adam Parry mention him and so do Albert Lord and Walter Ong, but his work is by and large either unknown, ignored, or not mentioned. Yet he was a precursor whose seminal work, more than thirty years ahead of its time, expounded many of the ideas contained in studies such as those of H. Riesenfeld (The Gospel Tradition and its Beginning: A Study in the Limits of Formgeschichte, 1957) and B. Gerhardson (Memory and Manuscript: Oral Tradition and Written Transmission in Rabbinic Judaism and Early Christianity, 1961). None of his published works is at present available in English although a translation of The Oral Style is soon to appear (Jousse 1990). The purpose of this article is to introduce Marcel Jousse through a short presentation of the origin and reception of his work, an outline of his ideas and a bibliography" (http://journal.oraltradition.org/files/articles/5i/6_sienaert.pdf).

Joyce used such influences "for all they were worth" despite his puns to the contrary. The Wake like the Glass (and incidentally all works of art to greater or lesser degrees) require and enjoy the employment of the word outside and inside themselves otherwise things go missing of such delicacy (such as the microstructures of the object, for instance, that are blind to us unless revealed by textual analysis) that the object (or artwork in question) is literally not there at all and has no influence on our thought, our way of life, an existence of the world in our minds as points for reflection of a literary almost conversational attitude to living.

The image: Shaun XI
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